• HOME
  • Teachers' blog
  • 【Housemates, Lodgers and Hyacinths】   *要点説明あり

Teachers' blog

2016年8月30日(火)

【Housemates, Lodgers and Hyacinths】   *要点説明あり

Ben
 
(Contributed by Ben)
 
I’ve been thinking about housemates and lodgers this week. First of all, I’ll explain the difference between them. A housemate is someone who lives in your house. It’s normally used to describe somebody you’re not related to. So, if students rent a house together, they often describe each other as housemates.
 
A lodger is slightly different. If you own a house, and you have a spare room, you can get a lodger. The lodger has their own bedroom, and you share the other rooms. Having a lodger is a bit like having a housemate, but the power-balance is less equal. When you’re all housemates, you make the rules together – so the house is a democracy. When you’re a lodger, the landlord is king or queen, so they make the rules.
 
For a few years, I had housemates. Some of the houses were wonderful, with good friends who lived well together. Some were a lot more difficult and untidy. I think I was probably quite an annoying housemate to begin with. I’m much better now. I’ve learnt how and when to do the washing up.
 
Now I have a house of my own, so I get to choose who lodges here. I’ve had some wonderful lodgers, but (sadly) they all move away eventually. My last lodger emigrated to America to get married. I get on very well with my current lodgers (and their cat), but they plan to move out soon: they need to live in a more wheelchair-accessible house. This one has too many stairs.
 
I work from home, so I care a lot about my house, and the people who live in it. The search for a new lodger is a bit scary. It’s made me think about all my old housemates. The good times, and the bad.
I had one housemate who preferred not to pay the rent or the bills. Obviously, this was a problem for everybody! When he was asked to pay the rent, he would recite this poem by John Greenleaf Whittier:
 
“If thou of fortune be bereft,
And in thine earthly store be left
Two loaves, sell one, and with the dole,
Buy hyacinths to feed thy soul.”
 
It’s written in quite old-fashioned English, so I’ll explain. The basic gist of the poem is this: if you don’t have any money or luck (if you’re ‘bereft of fortune’), and all you have is two loaves of bread, you should sell one of them, and use the money to buy flowers.
 
It’s a very nice idea, but my housemate took it too literally. He always had a lot of flowers and beautiful things, but no money; and he ate everybody else’s food. It made life rather difficult for everyone else in the house.
 
 
—————————————————————————————————————–
《要点》
【同居人、下宿人とヒヤシンス】
 
・同居人と下宿人について考えてみました。同居人は自分と関係のない人が、家に住んでいるときに言います。
 
・下宿人の場合は、家を持っていて、余分な部屋があるときに、下宿人を住まわせることができます。下宿人は個別の寝室を持ち、その他の部屋は共有します。
・同居人と似てはいますが、力関係が違います。
・住んでいる人が全員同居人であれば、全員でルールを作り、民主的に運営されます。
・下宿人の場合、家主が王様や女王様で、規則は家主が作るのです。
 
・数年間、同居人たちと暮らしました。
・ある家では仲良く友達として生活できました。
・また別な家では、関係は難しく、片付いていませんでした。
・私自身、同居人としてはかなり悩ましいメンバーだったと想像します。
・今ではかなりマシになってきました。いつ洗濯するべきかも、学びました。
 
・今、私は自分の家を持っているので、誰を下宿させるか選択することができます。
・素晴らしい下宿人もいましたが、そのうち皆引っ越していきました。
・最後の下宿人は、米国に行って結婚しました。
・現在、居る下宿人(とその飼い猫)とはとても仲良くしていますが、かれらも間もなく引っ越すことになっています。
・階段が多いので車椅子での移動に適した家に引っ越すのだそうです。
 
・私は在宅で仕事をしているので、家のことや住人のことを大いに気にかけています。
・新しい下宿人を探すのはちょっと怖い気がします。
・昔の同居人とのことが、良いこと悪いこと含めて、思い起こされます。
・同居人の一人は、家賃や共益費を払おうとしませんでした。これは住人全員にとって問題でした。家賃を払うよう要求されると、彼は以下の詩を引用しました。
 
“If thou of fortune be bereft,
And in thine earthly store be left
Two loaves, sell one, and with the dole,
Buy hyacinths to feed thy soul.”
(ジョン・グリーンリーフ・ホィッティア 米国詩人 1807-92)

 
・とても古い英語なので、説明しますと、次のようになります。
・「もし、お金も幸運もなくて、パンの固まり2つしかなければ、そのうち1つを打って、その金で花を買いなさい」
・アイデアはとても良いのですが、私の同居人はこれを文字通りに解釈し過ぎています。
・彼はいつも、花や美しいものをたくさん持っていましたが、金がなく、皆の食べ物をたかっていました。
・このため、家の中の他の人全員、生活が苦しくなってしまいました。
 
 
以上の要点はバーチャル英会話教室運営事務局により作成しております。
—————————————————————————————————————–
 
 

 
Copyright © 2014 NTT Learning Systems Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

PAGE TOP